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[sticky post] Comments, spam, and you

Because of the recent wave of spam comments I've set the community to require membership before you can comment. Membership is still open, so if you have something to say please join the community first. When this current situation is over I'll set us back to open commenting.

Userpic Factory

The Userpic Factory. I'm not quite sure when we started calling it the Create Userpic page. Must have been at least a year ago. Would this be just a minor thing or is it confusing enough for users that the name also needs to be changed in the FAQs?

There's FAQ98 and FAQ194. Maybe more, probably not.


FAQ260, V-Gifts

FAQ260 still mentions that the last ten Virtual Gifts received are displayed on your Profile page.

FAQ232

There is a typo (or two) in FAQ232.

I'm talking about the following sentence:
Ddd them to your Friends list them with the Add Friend button at the top-right of this page.
The error console is becoming more and more useful for troubleshooting as JavaScript is becoming more prevalent on the site, so I'm throwing together a quick & dirty FAQ for how to open it and use it in common browsers.

Read more...Collapse )

[edit] Added: http://www.livejournal.com/support/faq/400.html

New FAQ: How do I deal with spam?

This FAQ is meant to tie together all of our spam-related information, currently spread over several different categories. Ideally, I'd like to have a whole set of these quick-intro or chapter-listing style FAQs all grouped under the Quick Answer category, so they appear at the top of the FAQ list. When we have enough of them, FAQs like 286 and 105 should be moved up there as well.

I'm really looking for critique on how approchable this is, plus I'm still totally clueless on what to put in for the "E-mail from LiveJournal" section; any ideas are welcome. I'll be out of town until Tuesday, so I might not get back to this until then.


Spam comes in a variety of ways, and how it is delivered constantly changes. Marking comments, entries, and messages as spam instead of just deleting them helps LiveJournal to identify and remove spammers. You can control your exposure to spam, and deal with any spam you receive, by taking the following steps.

Dealing with spam

Because of the variety and amount of spam that arrives daily, it's important for LiveJournal's staff to see what is being called spam and how it arrives. Marking comments, entries, and messages as spam, instead of just deleting them, helps to identify repeat spammers and the latest avenues of attack.
Spam comments on your entries
Spam will often take the form of random comments in your journal or in your communities. By clicking on the "Spam" link or button for that comment you will mark it as spam, delete it from your entry, and ban the commenter from your journal.
If you have enabled Spam Protection for comments and messages comments that are likely to be spam will be screened and sequestered in a separate list of comments to an entry. When you click to view these suspicious comments you have the option to unscreen them or delete them. Deleting them from the suspicious comments list has the same effect as marking them as spam from the regular comment listing.(

Spam in communities
Spam in communities can come in the form of entries or comments. The community's owner or maintainers can delete an entry in the community as spam. They also have the same ability to mark a comment as spam as the entry author. Community moderators can reject any entry in the moderation queue as spam before it's even posted.

Spam messages in your inbox
Spam messages are less typical but still possible. If you receive spam in your inbox you can delete it by clicking the "Mark as spam" link below the message.

Email from or about LiveJournal
If you are receiving unexpected email from LiveJournal, and you do not use LiveJournal, you should first look to see if your email address is associated with any active LiveJournal accounts. If so, you can delete the account to stop any future emails from LiveJournal.
Beyond that, you can read more about the various emails that LiveJournal does and does not send. If you believe that any of the emails you have received are spam, please contact the Abuse Prevention Team to report this spam and to receive assistance.

Protecting yourself from spam

The following options can all help limit your exposure to spam, and to separate likely spam away from your journal/community/comments.
Spam comments on your entries
You can enable Spam Protection for comments and messages from the Privacy tab of the Account Settings page. You may also want to consider changing your comment settings to restrict who can leave comments on your entries. Restricting anonymous comments, or disabling comments entirely on certain entries popular with spammers, can help relieve any spam problems you are currently having.

Spam in communities
There are many ways to moderate your community to prevent spam entries from appearing. A combination of moderated membership and moderated posting can help to protect your community from spam, but you should examine each option fully before choosing what works for your community's situation.

Spam messages in your inbox
Spam Protection for your messages is part of the same option that enables spam protection for comments in your journal. You can also limit who is permitted to send you private messages.

Email from or about LiveJournal
If you do not use LiveJournal, you can prevent future email spam by looking up and deleting any LiveJournal accounts that may be associated with your email address. You should also consult with your email provider to learn about any available methods for blocking unwanted email.

Help! My entries and/or comments are being marked as spam

Due to the variety of anti-spam features that LiveJournal employs there is always a possibility that your legitimate entries or comments will be mis-identified as spam. If your entries or comments have been incorrectly mis-identified as spam, please open up a Support request, making sure to include where you were trying to leave the entry/comment and providing the exact text of of your entry/comment. In addition to contacting Support, you can also contact the journal owner or community owner/maintainers and ask them to mark your comment or entry as not-spam.



LiveJournal is constantly working to improve its anti-spam processes. LiveJournal's staff and engineers consult regularly about updating tactics in order to be most effective against spammers while not restricting legitimate users, however as spammers continue to develop new methods you may encounter spam on LiveJournal.
Spam itself comes in many forms including comments, entries, private messages, and even plain emails. You can control your exposure to spam, and deal with any spam you receive, by taking the following steps.

Dealing with spam

Because of the variety and amount of spam that arrives daily, it's important for LiveJournal's staff to see what is being called spam and how it arrives. Marking comments, entries, and messages as spam, instead of just deleting them, helps to identify repeat spammers and the latest avenues of attack.
Spam comments on your entries
Spam will often take the form of random comments in your journal or in your communities. By clicking on the "Spam" link or button for that comment you will mark it as spam, delete it from your entry, and ban the commenter from your journal. In community entries the community's owner and maintainers have the same ability to mark a comment as spam.
If you have enabled Spam Protection for comments and messages comments that are likely to be spam will be screened and sequestered in a separate list of comments to an entry. When you click to view these suspicious comments you have to option to unscreen them or delete them. Deleting them from the suspicious comments list has the same effect as marking them as spam from the regular comment listing.(

Spam entries in your communities
Spam entries to communities are also typical. The community's owner or maintainers can delete an entry in the community as spam. Community moderators can reject any entry in the moderation queue as spam before it's even posted.

Spam messages in your inbox
Spam messages are less typical but still possible. If you receive spam in your inbox you can delete it by clicking the "Mark as spam" link below the message.

Spam email from or about LiveJournal
If you are receiving unexpected email from LiveJournal, and you do not use LiveJournal, you should first look to see if your email address is associated with any active LiveJournal accounts. If so, you can delete the account to stop any future emails from LiveJournal.
Beyond that, you can read more about the various emails that LiveJournal does and does not send. If you believe that any of the emails you have received are spam, please contact the Abuse Prevention Team to report this spam and to receive assistance.

Protecting yourself from spam

The following options can all help limit your exposure to spam, and to segregate likely spam away from your journal/community/comments.
Spam comments on your entries
You can enable Spam Protection for comments and messages from the Privacy tab of the Account Settings page. You may also want to consider changing your commment settings to restrict who can leave comments on your entries. Restricting anonymous comments, or disabling comments entirely on certain entries popular with spammers, can help relieve any spam problems you are currently having.

Spam entries in your communities
There are many ways to moderate your community to prevent spam entries from appearing. A combination of moderated membership and moderated posting may be the best way to protect your community from spam, but you should examine each option fully before choosing what works for your community's situation.

Spam messages in your inbox
Spam Protection for your messages is part of the same option that enables spam protection for comments in your journal. You can also limit who is permitted to send you private messages.

Spam email from or about LiveJournal
If you do not use LiveJournal, you can prevent future email spam by looking up and deleting any LiveJournal accounts that may be associated with your email address. Afterwards, you should set up your email account to automatically filter out any mail that appears to come from or mentions "livejournal.com". You will need to consult your email client or email provider's website to learn how to do this.

Help! My entries and/or comments are being marked as spam

Due to the variety of anti-spam features that LiveJournal employs there is always a possibility that your legitimate entries or comments will be mis-identified as spam. If your entries or comments have been incorrectly mis-identified as spam, please open up a Support request, making sure to include where you were trying to leave the entry/comment and providing the exact text of of your entry/comment. In addition to contacting Support, you can also contact the journal owner or community owner/maintainers and ask them to mark your comment or entry as not-spam.



LiveJournal is constantly working to improve its anti-spam processes. As spammers contine to develop new tactics you may encounter spam on LiveJournal. LiveJournal's staff and engineers consult regularly about updating tactics in order to be most effective against spammers while not restricting legitimate users.
Spam itself comes in many forms including comments, entries, private messages, and even plain emails. You can control your exposure to spam, and deal with any spam you receive, by taking the following steps.

Dealing with spam

Because of the variety and amount of spam that arrives daily, it's important for LiveJournal's staff to see what is being called spam and how it arrives. Marking comments, entries, and messages as spam, instead of just deleting them, helps to identify repeat spammers and the latest avenues of attack.
Spam comments on your entries
Spam will often take the form of random comments in your journal or in your communities. By clicking on the "Spam" link or button for that comment you will mark it as spam, delete it from your entry, and ban the commenter from your journal. In community entries the community's owner and maintainers have the same ability to mark a comment as spam.
If you have enabled Spam Protection for comments and messages comments that are likely to be spam will be screened and sequestered in a separate list of comments to an entry. When you click to view these suspicious comments you have to option to unscreen them or delete them. Deleting them from the suspicious comments list has the same effect as marking them as spam from the regular comment listing.(

Spam entries in your communities
Spam entries to communities are also typical. The community's owner or maintainers can delete an entry in the community as spam. Community moderators can reject any entry in the moderation queue as spam before it's even posted.

Spam messages in your inbox
Spam messages are less typical but still possible. If you receive spam in your inbox you can delete it by clicking the "Mark as spam" link below the message.

Spam email from or about LiveJournal
If you are receiving unexpected email from LiveJournal, and you do not use LiveJournal, you should first look to see if your email address is associated with any active LiveJournal accounts. If so, you can delete the account to stop any future emails from LiveJournal.
Following that, any emails you receive from livejournal.com, or linking to any page at livejournal.com, are likely to be spam. Please contact the Abuse Prevention Team to report this spam and to receive assistance.

Protecting yourself from spam

The following options can all help limit your exposure to spam, and to segregate likely spam away from your journal/community/comments.
Spam comments on your entries
You can enable Spam Protection for comments and messages from the Privacy tab of the Account Settings page. You may also want to consider changing your commment settings to restrict who can leave comments on your entries. Restricting anonymous comments, or disabling comments entirely on certain entries popular with spammers, can help relieve any spam problems you are currently having.

Spam entries in your communities
There are many ways to moderate your community to prevent spam entries from appearing. A combination of moderated membership and moderated posting may be the best way to protect your community from spam, but you should examine each option fully before choosing what works for your community's situation.

Spam messages in your inbox
Spam Protection for your messages is part of the same option that enables spam protection for comments in your journal. You can also limit who is permitted to send you private messages.

Spam email from or about LiveJournal
If you do not use LiveJournal, you can prevent future email spam by looking up and deleting any LiveJournal accounts that may be associated with your email address. Afterwards, you should set up your email account to automatically filter out any mail that appears to come from or mentions "livejournal.com". You will need to consult your email client or email provider's website to learn how to do this.

Help! My entries and/or comments are being marked as spam

Due to the variety of anti-spam features that LiveJournal employs there is always a possibility that your legitimate entries or comments will be mis-identified as spam. If your entries or comments have been incorrectly mis-identified as spam, please open up a Support request, making sure to include where you were trying to leave the entry/comment and providing the exact text of of your entry/comment. In addition to contacting Support, you can also contact the journal owner or community owner/maintainers and ask them to mark your comment or entry as not-spam.



Controlling spam is an ongoing battle between the spammers and LiveJournal's team of engineers, and staff teams consult regularly about updating tactics in order to be most effective against spammers while not restricting legitimate users. Spam itself comes in many forms including comments, entries, private messages, and even plain e-mails.
You can control your exposure to spam, and help fight back against any spam you receive, by taking the following steps.

Dealing with spam

Because of the variety and amount of spam that arrives daily, it's important for LiveJournal's staff to see what is being called spam and how it arrives. Marking comments, entries, and messages as spam, instead of just deleting them, helps to identify repeat spammers and the latest avenues of attack.
Spam comments on your entries
Spam will often take the form of random comments in your journal or in your communities. By clicking on the "Spam" link or button for that comment you will mark it as spam, delete it from your entry, and ban the commenter from your journal. In community entries the community's owner and maintainers have the same ability to mark a comment as spam.

Spam entries in your communities
Spam entries to communities are also common. The community's owner or maintainers can delete an entry in the community as spam. Community moderators can reject any entry in the moderation queue as spam before it's even posted.

Spam messages in your inbox
Spam messages are less common but still possible. If you receive spam in your inbox you can delete it by clicking the "Mark as spam" link below the message.

Spam e-mail from LiveJournal
I'm not sure what to write here. Any ideas?

Protecting yourself from spam

The following options can all help limit your exposure to spam, and to segregate likely spam away from your journal/community/comments.
Spam comments on your entries
You can enable Spam Protection for comments and messages from the Privacy tab of the Account Settings page. You may also want to consider changing your commment settings to restrict who can leave comments on your entries.

Spam entries in your communities
There are many ways to moderate your community to prevent spam entries from appearing. A combination of moderated membership and moderated posting may be the best way to protect your community from spam, but you should examine each option fully before choosing what works for your community's situation.

Spam messages in your inbox
Spam Protection for your messages is part of the same option that enables spam protection for comments in your journal.

Spam e-mail from LiveJournal
After looking up and deleting any LiveJournal accounts that may be associated with your e-mail address, you should set up your e-mail account to automatically filter out any mail that appears to come from or mentions "livejournal.com". You will need to consult your e-mail client or provider's website to learn how to do this.

Help! My entries and/or comments are being marked as spam

Due to the variety of anti-spam features that LiveJournal employs there is always a possibility that your legitimate entries or comments will be mis-identified as spam. If your entries or comments have been incorrectly mis-identified as spam, please open up a Support request, making sure to include where you were trying to leave the entry/comment and providing the exact text of of your entry/comment.

filtering Friends Page by tags

Perhaps I am just missing something, but I combed through the FAQs and couldn't find a reference to the feature that lets you exclude or only track certain tags for a person on your Friends Page. Am I missing something (and if so, can we get some search words into that so it's easier to find?) or should I make up a draft?

Identity Account FAQs

As LiveJournal Support regularly uses the term identity accounts both in answers to users and amongst themselves, and some system pages refer to identity accounts, the FAQs should be updated to use this term.

For clarity, an identity account is an account that validates they user's identity through another service such as Google, Facebook, Mail.ru, and Twitter, as well as sites that support the OpenID protocol.

--
Proposed FAQ Merge: 283 and 318
New Name:
How can I log in to LiveJournal with OpenID, Facebook, Twitter, or Google? What is an identity account?

LiveJournal offers the ability to log into LiveJournal with your credentials from a number of other external sites. You can log into LiveJournal using your other site's account in one of two ways:


  • From the Home Page, click the Google icon (), Facebook icon (), or the Twitter icon (). You can also log in from other supported sites, as well as sites that support OpenID, by clicking the select more button () and choosing the appropriate service. From the next page, click the "Login" button for the site you wish to use. You may be directed to that site to authorize logging into LiveJournal with your username and password.
  • When posting a comment to a journal, click the drop-down menu with the LiveJournal userhead to select the site you wish to use to comment. Type your comment and click "Submit", then follow the prompts to log into your other account.


All accounts that use your identity from another service to allow you to comment on LiveJournal are known as identity accounts. Identity accounts use a trust relationship between LiveJournal and the identity service to allow you to comment on LiveJournal using an identity others will recognize without having to create a LiveJournal account. LiveJournal does not gain access to your password for the identity service and the identity service does not gain access to your LiveJournal password if you have one.

You cannot use an identity account to log in to an existing LiveJournal account. If you choose to upgrade your identity account to a full account, you can log in to that specific account using your identity account.

An OpenID account has a username of the form ext_number. Its profile is accessible through http://ext-number.livejournal.com/profile, and its Friends page is located at http://ext-number.livejournal.com/friends/, replacing number with the number associated with the account. An <lj user> tag for an identity account will link to its profile on LiveJournal when the alternative userhead is clicked. Clicking on the username will take you an appropriate page such as a profile page on an external site, since the account does not have a journal on LiveJournal.

Because identity accounts are not full LiveJournal accounts, they are subject to limitations on LiveJournal. An identity account can:

[bulleted list goes here. Suggest using list from from whichever FAQ has the correct limits and be sure to include the the email validation commentary from 283. Need to determine if OpenID accounts and other identity accounts use the same limits - they should.]

In addition, HTML placed in the bio of an identity account's profile will display as text.

--

FAQ 314
New Name: How do I convert my identity account into a LiveJournal account?

If you are currently using an identity account*, you can upgrade it to a full LiveJournal account while you are logged in using the following steps:


  • From the Home Page, click the Upgrade to Full Account link at the top of the page.
  • Select a username and password for your account.
  • Fill in required fields. Some may be be pre-filled for you depending on your identity service.
  • Lastly, fill out the human test, and click Convert Account.


At this point, you'll be taken to a page to fill in your profile. Again, depending on your identity service, some of this information may be pre-filled for you. You can edit anything that has been pre-filled if you desire. If you'd like to upgrade your account to a Paid Account, you can also do so during this process.

Once you have completed these steps, you'll receive an email confirming this process, and you can get started using your new LiveJournal! If you have not already validated your email address, this email will also contain a link asking you to validate your email address.

If you need some tips to help you get started, <a href="http://www.livejournal.com/support/faqbrowse.bml?faqid=207>this FAQ</a> contains some common questions and ideas for learning how to use the site.

Update FAQ 14

FAQ 14 currently states that no use of the <iframe> tag is permitted. This is wrong. It hasn't been updated since 2010, so here's my suggestion for a change to the last paragraph:


LiveJournal prohibits the direct use of several HTML tags: <iframe>, <embed>, and <object>, as well as some attributes of the <div> tag. Exceptions are made for the <iframe>, <embed>, and <object> tags when used to embed music, videos, or other active content into entries or profiles. Please note that the <iframe> tag can only be used in conjunction with sites that are on a site-wide whitelist of approved services. Using the <iframe> tag in conjunction with an unapproved service will result in no content being displayed.

In areas such as comments and customizations, you may need provide a text link to content you like to embed, rather than including it directly.

updating FAQ 160

I am surely beating a dead horse, but FAQ 160 is out of date and has been so for awhile. For one, we don't support IE7, says FAQ 324, so those instructions can be removed. The latest Firefox version is 13, and the current instructions are fine; the "9.x" can be replaced with "13.x".

lemur prevention specialist

fiddlingfrog has been added as docadmin.

Congratulations! They're all yours, chap! (New docadmin clears out, etc.)

Needs more information

FAQ 338 has some info on the "suspicious comments" thing, but I think it needs expansion.

1) People don't realize that once/if a comment has been sorted into the suspicioius comments section, deleting it will automatically mark it as spam. (It would be preferable for the "comment deleted" message to say so, but this is easier I think).

2) Journal owner is the only person to see the suspicious comments.

3) I'm not sure if this is from the comm's manual whitelist, general community whitelist, the spam protection, or an unholy combination of the above, but sometimes comments are screened. The FAQ should make it clear that it's from one of those and then links to how to get rid of it/instructions on how to disable the autoscreening, since many sites get blacklisted.

(ah, also, can someone add the tag "faq338"? I can't create tags.)

no further reading

FAQ250 has a section named Further Reading. The only thing in that section, the link "FAQ category: Customization in the Old Style System" goes to a place that does not exist.

Preview Button No Longer Exists

Sophie mentioned on IRC that there is a section of FAQ 72 that explicitly states a preview button is available for comments. This hasn't been true since R88.

Similarly, FAQ 15 says only Paid users can edit comments, which was changed shortly after R88 as a result of the preview function going away on the new site scheme pages.

Addendum, 4/11/2012:

FAQ 131 also lists the ability to edit comments as a paid account feature.
Would it be useful to have a table in 225, 330, or 332 (or maybe all of them) showing the differences between what an owner, maintainer, and moderator can do? Something like this, with appropriate cross-linking as necessary:

Version 4
Community settings
Owner Maintainer Moderator
Rename community yes no no
Delete community yes no no
Remove maintainers yes no no
Add new maintainers yes yes no
View and change community settings yes yes no
Change community style yes yes no
Send community email to all members yes yes no
Turn on & receive community pingbacks yes yes no
Membership
Invite, remove, or ban users yes yes no
Appoint or remove moderators yes yes no
Approve or reject requests for membership (if applicable) yes yes yes
Entries
Create a sticky entry yes yes no
Delete entries / Mark community entries as spam yes yes no
Approve or reject entries in the moderation queue of a moderated community yes yes yes
Create tags yes yes Sometimes, see note 1 below1
Add tags to entry yes yes yes
Remove tags from entry yes yes Sometimes, see note 1 below1
Comments
Delete comments yes yes no
Freeze comments yes yes yes
Screen comments yes yes yes
See screened comments yes yes Sometimes, see note 2 below2
Unscreen comments yes yes Sometimes, see note 2 below2

Notes:

1 - While a moderator can always add existing tags, they can only create new tags or remove tags from an entry if the "Who can create new tags and add/remove tags from entries" on Manage Tags is set to Members Only, Any User, or to a Custom Security Group that contains that moderator.

2 - When a moderator screens a comment that comment is collapsed but a link remains for the moderator to unscreen the comment. If they refresh the page, that comment will then be entirely hidden and can't be unscreened.


Version 3
Owner Maintainer Moderator
Community settings
Rename community x
Delete community x
Remove maintainers x
Add new maintainers x x
View and change community settings x x
Change community style x x
Membership
Invite, remove, or ban users. Appoint or remove moderators x x
Approve or reject requests for membership (if applicable) x x x
Entries
Delete entries x x
Approve or reject entries in the moderation queue of a moderated community x x x
Create tags x x #
Add tags to entry x x x
Remove tags from entry x x #
Comments
Delete comments x x
Freeze comments x x x
Screen comments x x x
See screened comments x x *
Unscreen comments x x *



Version 2
Owner Maintainer Moderator
Rename community x
Delete community x
Remove maintainers x
Add new maintainers x x
View and change community settings x x
Change community style x x
Invite, remove, or ban users x x
Approve or reject requests for membership (if applicable) x x x
Delete entries x x
Delete comments x x
Freeze comments x x x
Screen comments x x x
See screened comments x x *
Unscreen comments x x *
Create tags x x #
Add tags to entry x x x
Remove tags from entry x x #
Approve or reject entries in the moderation queue of a moderated community x x x




Version 1
Owner Maintainer Moderator
Rename community x
Delete community x
Remove maintainers x
Add new maintainers x x
View and change community settings x x
Change community style x x
Invite, remove, or ban users x x
Approve or reject requests for membership (if applicable) x x x
Delete entries or comments x x
Freeze or screen comments, and see screened comments x x x
Create, edit, and delete entry tags x x x
Approve or reject entries in the moderation queue of a moderated community x x x



* - When a moderator screens a comment, that comment is collapsed but a link remains for the moderator to unscreen the comment. If they refresh the page, that comment will then be entirely hidden and can't be unscreened.
# - While a moderator can always add existing tags, they can only create new tags or remove tags from an entry if the "Who create new tags and add/remove tags from entries" on Manage Tags is set to Members Only or Any User

Update to FAQ 248

I updated the "warning bar" at the top of FAQ 248 to reflect the fact that, although the FAQ is in the "Advanced Customizations" category, only some of the customizations discussed require a Paid account. For example, adding a header image or anything else that just requires fiddling with options on the Customize Journal Style page doesn't. Also, some layouts (not restricted to Paid accounts) can reverse the order of entries on a page, so it wouldn't be correct to say that a Paid account is required to be able to reverse entry order.

embedding journal

FAQ68
I think in the sentence "Most methods of embedding your website require that you know your style's identification number" - your website should be your journal.

Do you agree?

FAQ 324 updated

...to reflect that we no longer support IE 7.

HTTPS URLs for feeds

LiveJournal does not support feeds URLs beginning with anything other than "http://". This excludes not only the "feed://" pseudo-scheme but also SSL sites whose URLs start with "https://".

I can imagine that supporting SSL is technically not a problem (I presume that LWP::Simple, or whatever LiveJournal uses to fetch feeds, supports SSL), so this might be either a policy reason (to reduce load?) or an oversight (in which case I presume that suggestions might be the place to turn).

In any event, while the restriction applies, it would be good to document this; the error message, "The URL you have typed is invalid. Please make sure you have typed the URL correctly and try again.", is not terribly informative since https:// URLs look fine to most Internet users.

So I would suggest at least adding this case to FAQ 151 "Why might a syndicated account not update correctly?" (unless you can think of a better place; say, FAQ 137 "How do I watch feeds on my Friends list? What are syndicated accounts?" which explains how to create one?).

Something along these lines, perhaps?

Invalid or unsupport URL scheme: LiveJournal only supports feeds whose URL starts with "http://". If the feed URL you have starts with "feed://", replace it with "http://"; if it starts with "https://" or anything else other than "http://", check to see whether the content is also available from a plain "http://" URL.

FAQ 290 Way Out Of Date

FAQ 290 thinks the latest version of the iOs app is .6 and does not mention that there are apps for Android, Windows Mobile, or Bada, all of which are linked here: http://www.livejournal.com/devices/.

It hasn't been updated since 2009.

New FAQ: How do I clear my browser's cookies?

[Edit] And we have a second draft:

Subject: What are cookies? How do I delete LiveJournal cookies from my browser?

Cookies are small files stored by your browser which are used to identify you to the website you are visiting. Generally, this is to provide you with faster, easier access to the website.

How to delete cookies stored by LiveJournal varies depending on which browser you are using. Below are instructions on how to delete cookies in the most recent version of the browsers LiveJournal supports:

Firefox (Windows):

1. In the "Tools" menu, select "Options".
2. Click on the "Privacy" tab, then click the "remove individual cookies" link.
3. In the search box, type livejournal, select all cookies found, and click the "Remove Cookie" button.

Firefox (Mac):

1. In the "Firefox" menu, select "Preferences...".
2. Click on the "Privacy" tab, then click the "remove individual cookies" link.
3. In the search box, type livejournal, select all cookies found, and click the "Remove Cookie" button.

Chrome:

1. In the Chrome/wrench menu, select "Options" (Windows) or "Preferences..." (Mac & Linux)
2. Click on "Under the Hood", then click on "Content Settings".
3. In the "Cookies" section, click the "All cookies and site data..." button.
4. In the search box, type livejournal, and click the "Remove All" button.

Internet Explorer:

1. Open Internet Explorer and go to http://www.livejournal.com/.
2. Press F12 on your keyboard. A box should open up at the bottom of the screen.
3. In this toolbar, open the "Cache" dropdown, and select "Clear cookies for domain".
4. Select "Yes".

Safari:

1. In the "Safari" menu, open "Preferences..."
2. Click the "Security tab", then click the "Show Cookies" button.
3. In the search box, type livejournal, select each cookie found, and click the "Remove Cookie" button.

Opera (Windows):

1. In the Opera menu, select Settings, then Preferences.
2. Click the "Advanced" tab, select "Cookies", then click the "Manage Cookies" button.
3. In the search box, type livejournal, select each cookie found, and click the "Delete" button.

Opera (Mac):

1. In the "Tools" menu, click "Private Data..." A dialog box will appear.
2. Click the small triangle to the right of the words "Detailed Options".
3. Click the "Manage Cookies" button.
4. In the search box, type livejournal, and select each cookie found and click the "Delete" button.

Note: How to delete cookies may vary slightly depending on the version of your operating system and browser.

Tags:

To start off, I never used the navstrip before the major update a few months ago. When I did enable it I was really pleased to find out that the calendar function on the navstrip lets me (and presumably anyone with a paid/permanent account) use the date function of the friends page much easier than having to manually add ?date=YYYY-MM-DD to the URL.
Unfortunately, when I went to answer a request today and add that info to my answer, having seen the requester with the navstrip on their journal, I couldn't find it in any FAQ. I' mnot sure if it should go in 219 with the reading by date info, or in 264 with the navstrip info. In fact, it's been two years since 264 was updated at all, so maybe a listing of the features available on the strip would be in order.

New FAQ for spam protection option

With release 83 yesterday, the 'Spam protection' checkbox over here now covers both comments and private messages. So the following is the FAQ draft for this feature. This would be a FAQ that is linked to from anywhere that's talking about controlling comments, comment spam, unwanted comments, etc, such as:

-- FAQ 23 - How do I control who can post comments in my journal? - Put a bullet point of "Activate the Spam Protection feature" at the bottom of the bullet point list, then remove that hastily-added last paragraph.

-- FAQ 201 - How do I mark a comment as spam? What does this option do? - Stick a line in here somewhere about "If you are receiving spam comments, go activate blah blah."

-- FAQ 109 - What should I do if I'm receiving harassing or unwanted comments?" - Same sort of thing. "If you're receiving spam, blah blah."

There may be other locations as well, but those are the obvious ones I saw.

Also note that this is intentionally non-specific as to how things are actually identified as spam. We do not want to be broadcasting what we're considering to be spam or how our systems are making determinations, etc.

NOTE: The images are just quick crappy things I did in Paint just to show "here's what images likely work here." When this is taken and put up for real, I'm sure a designer can get us better quality images than these.




Title: "How do I help protect myself from receiving spam comments and messages?"

The Spam Protection setting can be activated to help automatically identify potential spam comments and messages. Activating the feature will take the following actions for both comments and private messages; it is not possible to activate it for only one or the other.

Spam protection for comments

When Spam Protection is activated, comments posted to your journal which our system has identified as potential spam based on a variety of criteria will be automatically marked as spam and moved to a suspicious comments section. Any comments posted by users you have added as a friend will never be automatically marked as spam.

When viewing an entry with comments that have been automatically identified as spam, you will see a '[#] suspicious comments' link next to the total number of comments that have been posted to the entry.



Click the 'Read suspicious comments' link to review the potential spam comments at any time. If an individual comment is not actually spam, you can use the Not Spam button to unscreen it and move it to the main comments page.

Spam protection for messages

When Spam Protection is activated, private messages from users who have been identified as potential spammers are marked as spam and moved to a special folder in the Inbox. As with comments, you can review these messages at any time to either delete them or mark them as not spam.

Updating FAQ160

FAQ 160 could use instructions for clearing the cache for the following browsers:
Internet Explorer 9
Firefox 5 (both Mac OS and Windows)

Would people who have these browsers like to write up instructions and post them in a comment here? Thanks!

FAQ 299

There's rather embarrassingly broken markup on FAQ 299.

I believe the mistake is in paragraph beginning "To sign up, log into LiveJournal and click".

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